The Rights of Children

Should children have rights when parents and other family members fight?

Needs of Children_Freedom to Know Their Parents and Be Protected

Excerpt of material borrowed from Jennifer Baker PhD’s article on this case of child abuse and deprivation:

“Barbara Bennett Woodhouse  is the L. Q. C. Lamar Chair in Law at Emory and serves as faculty advisor for the Barton Child Law and Policy Clinic.

She is one of our most eminent scholars on the topic of children’s rights. She has developed an account of five basic human rights that represent what other experts agree is crucial to the well-being of children. (Please read her excellent book on children’s rights, here(link is external).)

These are: privacy rights. While we are familiar with how these work in regard to adult lives, for children, “the basic unit of privacy is not the individual but the relationship between the child and the caregiver. “ Children, in other words, need us to respect their relationships and their capacities to form relationships.

Agency rights. Children develop voices and they have agency. They need to have a voice in matters that affect them, even if “they are not ready to take responsibility for the ultimate choice.” Children are both citizens-in-training and valuable in their own right, as they are.

Equality. Children, dependent on communities as they are, deserve access to the necessities of life that other children in the community are given.

Dignity. Children are their own persons, and “laws that penalized innocent children for the sins of their parents,” as existed in the Victorian era, have come to look “inhumane.”

And finally, protection rights. Civilization depends on the weak being protected from the strong. Situations where children are put in danger of harm violate these children’s rights.

Woodhouse explains that children’s rights flow “from the same set of basic values” that give adults rights. We cannot, in other words, pretend adult rights are on some firmer basis than those of children.”

Do you agree?

Let us know: MyAdvocateCenter.com

Use your voice,

Deb Beacham

 

Forbes on Bankruptcy After Divorce

“Some people are pushed into bankruptcy by their former spouse. Let’s say they owned a house together but they either don’t want to sell it (because they want the children to keep living there) or they can’t sell it because it’s upside down. One of them agrees to pay the mortgage; it might be the spouse who lives there, or it might be the ex who is supporting him or her. But the mortgage doesn’t get paid. Maybe that spouse eventually files for bankruptcy, and the other one ends up having to file in order to keep the house and catch up on payments, or to discharge their responsibility for the remaining loan.”

What this Forbes article does not spell out is that professional misconduct plays a large role in ensuring that at least one of the parties doesn’t make it – meaning they are not able to maintain stability, to prosper, and to give the best they have to their children. Their best has been undermined and taken away. Many mothers and fathers are filing bankruptcy following divorce and child custody cases, but we believe much of this loss could be avoided.

Avoid BankruptcyWhen you review billing records and communications with child custody experts and between attorneys, you can see that, unfortunately, this is intentional in some cases. It is these cases we refer to when we ask authorities to review cases.

Forbes contributor Emma Johnson makes a sound argument here for paying attention to your credit score and working to protect yourself, but make sure you’re aware of the diligence needed in selecting professionals who will not aim for breaking the bank – your bank – in your family law or child custody case.

Financial matters are a key focus for our professionals belonging to our Resource Directory and for those featured on Pro Advocate Radio.

 

Check out ProAdvocateRadio.com to learn more from one of our financial advisors, Wendy Hayes. Wendy is a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst and is committed to helping families reset priorities so that their financial resources and time are preserved for themselves and for their children. Listen here to Wendy’s sound counsel.