Financial Guidance During Divorce

Financial Guidance During Divorce Can Make All the Difference

While that statement seems obvious, the issue is where you obtain your advice and knowing whether your counsel actually has your best interests in mind, or not.

Financial counselors, like attorneys and child custody experts, are not all equal and a handful will actually stand by or participate in helping to misguide you during a very emotional and turbulent family conflict.

One trust source of information is nationally recognized author, speaker and advisor Jeff Landers.

We invite you to read his work, and let us know if you need help selecting a local expert to review your situation and to assist legal counsel during a divorce or other legal or financial matter.

Financial Uncertainty & Resentment Towards a Partner’s Financial Status is a Large Factor Contributing to the Divorce Rate

If there is a way to get the right counsel at the onset of conflict and disagreement, please do not hold back in trying to resolve the issues before hiring lawyers and filing for divorce.

You may find out there are options you did not know were available to you otherwise, and in many cases, it’s worth the investment and taking a chance.

Please contact us if you are seeking financial guidance and before deciding on a team of professionals if you are caught in conflict that may lead you into the legal system.

Founder’s Tip:

Just because many family law attorneys use certain forensic accounting firms that does not mean there is any value to be had in signing a contract, paying a retainer and hoping for the best in the end. Get informed from those who have gone before you in this process. 

The exterior of a Bankruptcy Court building

Data gathered by My Advocate Center shows that there is a way to manage through family conflict without being forced into bankruptcy. Understanding fiduciary duty is a good first step.

The Rights of Children

Should children have rights when parents and other family members fight?

Needs of Children_Freedom to Know Their Parents and Be Protected

Excerpt of material borrowed from Jennifer Baker PhD’s article on this case of child abuse and deprivation:

“Barbara Bennett Woodhouse  is the L. Q. C. Lamar Chair in Law at Emory and serves as faculty advisor for the Barton Child Law and Policy Clinic.

She is one of our most eminent scholars on the topic of children’s rights. She has developed an account of five basic human rights that represent what other experts agree is crucial to the well-being of children. (Please read her excellent book on children’s rights, here(link is external).)

These are: privacy rights. While we are familiar with how these work in regard to adult lives, for children, “the basic unit of privacy is not the individual but the relationship between the child and the caregiver. “ Children, in other words, need us to respect their relationships and their capacities to form relationships.

Agency rights. Children develop voices and they have agency. They need to have a voice in matters that affect them, even if “they are not ready to take responsibility for the ultimate choice.” Children are both citizens-in-training and valuable in their own right, as they are.

Equality. Children, dependent on communities as they are, deserve access to the necessities of life that other children in the community are given.

Dignity. Children are their own persons, and “laws that penalized innocent children for the sins of their parents,” as existed in the Victorian era, have come to look “inhumane.”

And finally, protection rights. Civilization depends on the weak being protected from the strong. Situations where children are put in danger of harm violate these children’s rights.

Woodhouse explains that children’s rights flow “from the same set of basic values” that give adults rights. We cannot, in other words, pretend adult rights are on some firmer basis than those of children.”

Do you agree?

Let us know: MyAdvocateCenter.com

Use your voice,

Deb Beacham