What is Stalking and Why is it a Dangerous Crime?

The Fatality Review Annual Report for 2017 addresses misconceptions about stalking and explains why it is a much more dangerous crime, connecting to more deaths of domestic violence victims, than most people realize.

Stalking involves a course of conduct by the perpetrator that is meant to cause fear and uncertainty or an expectation of harm in the victim. It is often an unseen or almost invisible crime, but the danger lurking around the corner or in the shadows is always a sign of trauma and injury to follow.

This course of conduct is also found in civil cases where one party – the aggressor or perpetrator of crimes paying to avoid accountability and block protection for the victim and children involved – uses stalking tactics to destabilize the victim. It is no less of a crime when stalking occurs in the context of a scheme to cause harm during litigation. The intent is provoke the victim into appearing more scared and to the point of looking paranoid than the targeted party would be otherwise. Because stalking can be obscured and sometimes explained away by the perpetrator, the victim may be easily discredited and thereby unable to receive protection. The perpetrator is then free to continue the stalking and harassing behavior. In situations like the one just described, the perpetrator often uses others to stalk and harass by proxy.

This scenario is one seen in many cases reported to My Advocate Center, and it is often the case that professionals being paid by the perpetrator are assisting in the series of crimes by coordinating and covering for the perpetrator. Doing so is profitable because it also helps prolong litigation as the perpetrator will pay to escalate the stress and injury to the victim while avoiding accountability for the criminal behavior. This is a dangerous trend in family courts and one that must be addressed now before more lives are lost – including those of the children witnessing this form of domestic or family violence.

 

Georgia Domestic Violence – Fatality Review Annual Report 2017 by Deb Beacham on Scribd

Investigating Backpage and Exploitation

Exploitation is one of the worst diseases of all time in our society.

Exploitation isn’t a new disease; acts of abuse in taking advantage of those who are vulnerable, who can be beaten down, held hostage in some manner, used for work, sex, entertainment, experiments, etc., and to increase the perpetrators’ profits have occurred since the beginning of our existence.

It is almost impossible to avoid as it occurs in many forms, so when an investigation such as this one into the website Backpage and the people running it leads to a shutdown, seizure and federal charges, it’s a big win.

Exploitation of others, especially of children, isn’t going to slow down until profit centers collapse and perpetrators are exposed. In my work and throughout this website I explore and report on various forms of exploitation and abuse. I believe it’s important to identify the pressure points in society where vulnerabilities are created or worsened, where families are broken down, parent-child relationships disintegrated and children destabilized to a point that puts them at much greater risk for harm. Families in conflict, especially when children are involved, are ripe for exploitation. It is profitable to take advantage and to use children to increase profits.

Common sense, even without all of the available data, tells us that when you destabilize children, increase uncertainty, take away needed medical and psychological healthcare, traumatize them by denying access to nurturing and safe parents, enable perpetrators of physical and psychological abuse, you are setting our young ones up to fail. You are also creating inventory for those who profit from exploitation of children.

What is Backpage and what is the impact of this investigation?

As seen in Reuters online news:

Groups and political leaders working to end forced prostitution and child exploitation celebrated the shutdown of Backpage, a massive ad marketplace that is primarily used to sell sex. This effort involved multiple states and federal authorities including the FBI, IRS and also the US Postal Service. The website posting said U.S. attorneys in Arizona and California, as well as the Justice Department’s section on child exploitation and obscenity and the California and Texas attorneys general had helped shut down the website.

“Today, Backpage was shutdown. It’s a huge step. Now no child will be sold for sex through this website,” tweeted US Senator Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota.

Heitkamp helped draft legislation passed by the Senate last month that makes it easier for state prosecutors and sex-trafficking victims to sue social media networks, advertisers and others that fail to keep sex trafficking and exploitative materials off their platforms. The bill passed by an overwhelming bipartisan vote of 97-2.

President Donald Trump will sign the bill into law next week, said Heitkamp. The legislation, featured prominently in the popular Netflix documentary “I am Jane Doe,” amends the Communications Decency Act, which has shielded website operators from state criminal charges or civil liability if they facilitate sex ads or prostitution.

“Shutting down the largest online U.S. marketplace for sex trafficking will dramatically reduce the profitability of forcing people into the commercial sex trade, at least in the short term,” said Bradley Myles, chief executive of Polaris, an international anti-slavery group that runs the National Human Trafficking Hotline.

There would be “a dramatic shift in the marketplace starting tonight,” Myles added.

This article by Medium explains more about the steps and effort involved to achieve the passage of SESTA and the shutdown of Backpage.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE FEDERAL LEGISLATION HERE.

The legislation followed a two-year investigation by the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs’ Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, on which Heitkamp serves, into ads placed on Backpage.com of victims of sex trafficking, including in North Dakota.

The new federal law will empower states to do more to protect those vulnerable to trafficking. The name of the legislation is the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act (SESTA).

Specifically, SESTA would:

  • Allow victims of sex trafficking to seek justice against websites that knowingly or recklessly facilitated the crimes against them.
  • Eliminate federal liability protections for websites that assist, support, or facilitate a violation of federal sex trafficking laws.
  • Enable state law enforcement officials, not just the federal Department of Justice, to take action against individuals or businesses that violate federal sex trafficking laws.

Senator Heitkamp emphasized that this legislation is necessary to immediately provide victims an avenue to seek justice for their exploitation – and make sure that companies will be held liable to the fullest extent of the law for profiting from this form of modern-day slavery.

Note: until there is greater liability and consequences for those profiting from all forms of exploitation of children, both online and offline, our children will not be safe. This work at the state and federal level to take down this website and charge the people responsible for facilitating child sex trafficking is a great step; it is already having a powerful impact on the exploitation of minors.

In local Georgia news:

Atlanta news station WSB-TV’s reporter Lauren Pozen interviewed advocate Kasey McClure of 4Sarah.net along with attorney Esther Panitch who is waging battles for victims childhood sexual abuse.

“Lots of companies who host other people, who communicate through them, are really going to be watchful for to see how far this goes because it’s not just an unpopular website like backpage, but will it affect other websites that maybe are kind of on the line,” said Channel 2 legal analyst Esther Panitch.

Advocates for victims of sex trafficking say the takedown  is a step in the right direction.

“More victims started coming forward and saying this is happening to me and I think people started recognizing they had a problem. The issue that is going on with backpage is them being held accountable for basically allowing men to exploit and rape minors,” said advocate Kasey McClure, who founded 4sarah.net.

How does this affect my community, my children?

Backpage.com let users create posts to sell items but it is mostly known for prostitution among adults but also trafficking children.

Channel 2 Action News reported child trafficking as recently as last month in Cobb County where police found prostitutes as young as 14 years old inside a Marietta motel. Teens told police they were forced to create ads on backpage.com.

Children should not be treated as commodities, should not be sold or exploited, ever. They deserve our focus, and need our time and resources to protect them. Do you agree? Contact me here to learn more about what you can do.

Noteworthy Research by My Advocate Center

Studies show that it is routine practice for professionals involved in family conflict to break down relationships between protective parents and children. It is routine practice to engage in psychological abuse of the children and to put them in harm’s way, escalating stress and worsening coping mechanisms.

These children become more vulnerable to addiction and exploitation.

Why is this happening? The answer is multi-faceted but simple:

  • It’s profitable to do so.
  • Family conflict cases create ripe opportunities to increase profits at the expense of victims of abuse and/or fraud.
  • Perpetrators of abuse are motivated to spend more to avoid consequences; they are also often led to break other laws to avoid exposure.
  • Parents who are desperate for protection, including for their children, are easy to destabilize and take advantage of during litigation; trauma is intentionally caused and used to wear them down, using up time and financial resources as well as removing community support from them in the process.
  • Children can be easily isolated or cut off from the protective parent and worn down or brainwashed into not resisting against abuse; during the course of such abuse the children are also often denied the kind of medical and psychological treatment needed to survive and cope with what has happened to them.
  • There is no oversight, let alone accountability, for those exploiting and profiting from this form of child trafficking.
    • Even in cases where child sexual abuse has been confirmed by DFCS or other forensic experts, the result is the withholding of protection and a coverup of the abuse.
    • Even when professionals obtained proof the abuser created and/or possessed child pornography, this evidence did not serve to protect the children.
  • Anyone trying to stand up for their right to protect their children faces attacks to discredit and destabilize them; and may even be denied due process, including being prevented from presenting evidence and testimony in their defense.
  • Children who have asked to be heard are silenced, with some sent out of state and isolated by appointed court professionals such as psychologists acting as “evaluators” of the family conflict concerning the children.
    • Children who are not sent away are still restricted and controlled through the use of certain therapists and/or guardians who serve to control the thought process of abused children, and filter or control the flow of information to and from the children.
    • The professionals in these roles will often also submit false reports to courts, give false testimony to protect the abuser and/or to blame the protective parent.
  • Putting profit over protection is the norm that parents are not warned of before submitting their lives and giving up their rights in our courts

Use this form to report a situation involving any of the above issues. For reports involving child abuse, click here.

Fortunately there are also legislators at the national level who understand this is a major problem;

The mishandling of family conflict by professionals who control and profit from undoing and withholding what children need, including safety and the nurturing care of a safe parent, is a problem that feeds the sexual predation industry and also benefits from it. The two areas of exploitation serve the other and conflict with the key policies and statements set forth in this concurrent resolution in our U.S. Congress.

  • Child Safety must be the first priority in matters of custody litigation, and states should improve how custody cases are adjudicated
  • 15 million children per year are exposed to domestic violence or child abuse, which are often linked
  • Child sexual abuse is significantly under-documented and under-addressed in the legal system
  • Child abuse is a major public health problem with an estimated total cost of $124 billion related to child maltreatment, including physical, sexual, psychological abuse and neglect, and that is just for one year’s worth of confirmed cases.
  • The CDC’s work on Adverse Childhood Experiences (“ACE”) further explains the harmful impact in this resolution
  • Allegations of family violence, child abuse and child sexual abuse are discounted often in litigation
  • Perpetrators of abuse are often given custody of the children. There’s more, but you get the idea.

My parting thought for you is this question:

Is it possible to strengthen families and to better protect children so that we eliminate the vulnerability of children to predators?

Deb Beacham

 

McCool’s Significant Pushback with Tony Robbins

If you could hit the re-wind button and give him a chance to give a fresh response to Nanine McCool, the woman who calmly dared to challenge him on his stage, what would you have Tony Robbins say to her?  Think about this before you answer. What would you have someone with such a large presence, his 6’7″ stature aside, in the corporate coaching arena impress upon his followers? You’ll want to see the Today Show clip at the bottom of this page to see just who McCool is, what she represents and how Robbins later responded!

It’s possible that his challenger taught us more than Robbins possibly could have given his limited experience on this subject. That’s my main take-away, that McCool gave us something, a valuable method for responding, to use in a situation such as this. We should all focus on her strategy and how she undid even his PR team that couldn’t get this video off the web fast enough.

Initially, most people responded in disgust over Robbins’ callous and lame statements. What an opportunity he had, right here, to empower both women and men, but he blew it!  Is this the end of it, the noise being made about his deplorable remarks, or will someone – or a group of significant someones – run with the opportunity to make a positive impact on our culture?

Personally, I’m so glad – grateful – that The Good Men Project picked this up and ran with it in doing this interview with Nanine McCool. Excellent article!

Can we unite around McCool and other voices of reason?

It wasn’t just what she said to Robbins, but how she said it, calmly but firmly and with a smile on her face. That’s what I’ll remember.

How we respond to victims of abuse and whether or not we take a stand to stop harassment, exploitation and the destruction of lives matters in a big way. It matters so much more than how many books you sell or how big the stadium is that you pack out. But how do we get people to open their minds and change behavior when someone who is so influential speaks and behaves this way?

Robbins is facing backlash over this exchange, which was shown in a video clip than ran through Twitter like wild-fire over the weekend. The short clip managed to make it out to the public after his team had the longer version pulled from the web. The full version became available today, and can be viewed below.

“I’m not mocking the #MeToo movement, I’m mocking victimhood,” he told McCool and the audience, according the longer video from the event. “If you use the #MeToo movement to try to get significance and certainty by attacking and destroying someone else…all you’ve done is basically use a drug called significance to make yourself feel good.”

McCool stood her ground: “I hear you mischaracterizing the #MeToo movement. Certainly there are people who are using it for their own personal devices, but there’s also a significant number of people who are using it not to relive whatever may have happened to them, but to make it safe for the young women…And I think you do the whole movement a disservice by characterizing it the way you have.”

Robbins said he didn’t want to be misinterpreted, and invited McCool to join him at the center of the room. He then asked her to hold out her fist. When she did, he put his hand on her fist and pushed her backwards.

“So you’re telling me the the harder I push, the more you’re gonna comply, and I’m going to be safe,” Robbins said as he pushed McCool backwards. After a little back and forth banter between Robbins and the woman, he stopped and said, “When you push someone else, it doesn’t make you more safe. It just makes them angry.”

My first reaction to this is that he can’t possibly comprehend what he’s done, not fully, because he doesn’t know what it’s like to be mistreated because of being more vulnerable than someone else. The above exchange isn’t what fired me up enough to write about this.  Hang on…

The founder of the Me Too Movement gave a great response as seen in this Mashable article.

When I first saw the short version of this exchange that took place before this enormous audience, I was just in shock. How could he not recognize what he was doing and why it was so wrong, so offensive and backwards? When he used the story about male friends who have told him they are afraid of hiring that woman because she’s attractive, conveying the message that the voice of survivors of sexual assault is causing problems for women in hiring decisions, it set us way back. Way, way back. Many of us believed him to be enlightened, someone we wanted our corporate leaders to consult with and take advice from. No longer is that my opinion.

No more is my answer. That was my answer when I heard an executive I believed in 15 years ago say he couldn’t hire the attractive woman to be his direct report; he didn’t trust himself, so her career would suffer when he wasn’t honest about why he didn’t hire her. And this is my answer now: we must and can do better in helping our young men learn how to respect and treat women. Respecting others in general, learning empathy and finding better ways to communicate…lots to work on!

The challenge for Robbins posed by Destin Gerek of The Good Men Project is that he make amends. To do that in a genuine and meaningful way, he needs to be educated, not just coached by the TR team. Therein lies the opportunity for Robbins and others in his place of influence. If they take the time and use their resources to understand what victimization is and how survivors manage through injury and trauma to overcome it, if they invest personally and in public speech to reduce assault and exploitation in various forms, they can create a win for themselves and for the rest of us. It’s possible, and I hope many will watch to see how they respond, and talk about what happens next.

Only a few days later, this interview aired on national television. Take a look!

Nanine McCool was comfortable standing up and speaking against what she felt was wrong. It’s no surprise to learn that she was a fierce advocate for the truth in child custody matters. Also not surprising is the fact that she was invited to accept discipline in her state for her advocacy; declining to agree with a condemnation of her work which she knew would suppress the truth of the situation – the need to stand up to wrongdoing and further harm of a victim of abuse and the children involved – McCool surrendered her law license. This is the kind of oppression, the kind of false narrative, many are up against as they seek to protect themselves and their children.

Watch how Robbins responds after re-thinking his position:

 

What kind of opportunity do we have before us?

This is so much more than a news story or a social media trend about a major personality getting it wrong. Big foot in big mouth wrong. It’s a significant chance to influence how we treat others and especially how we respond to someone who has been harmed or is still in harm’s way. And, it’s a really exciting chance to change minds about the issues raised in this video and by the #MeTooMovement.  Thank you, Nanine McCool and Tarana Burke!

Take a chance and stand up for someone like Nanine McCool did here when she stood up for many.

I dare you!

Deb Beacham

Pushback Maven at My Advocate Center, Inc.

 

Troubling Endorsements of Sexual Harassment and Abuse

It’s hard to image how we as a society stomp out sexual abuse and harassment and truly help victims of assault when those in positions of power and authority do not take it seriously. When efforts to seek accountability fail, it sends a message to predators that they are free to continue.

Two situations come to mind for me as clear and overwhelming examples of this problem with accountability. Both situations are well documented and involve many offensive acts which did cause severe and lasting damages to victims.

In learning of these and other such situations involving abuse, a cover up and avoidance of accountability, I couldn’t help but ask this: if this kind of misconduct is tolerated and protected, what else are these predators and those who protect them willing to do? Does any life, any right, any need…matter to them?

AUGUSTA: OUTSIDE THE GATES

In Georgia, in the family law area of our legal system, a sexual predator was given the position of Guardian ad Litem in many domestic cases involving child custody disputes. The role of this person as Guardian position lasted for years, so let yourself imagine how many lives were negatively impacted over that time and for years to follow. Unless you’ve been subjected to such pain and loss, however, it will be impossible to fathom the depth of suffering.

I’ll address the details of abuse by court-appointed Guardians (GAL’s) more fully in a separate post, but there are many and they are fueled by the same mentality that people are there to be used and taken advantage of, even when the court professional is a sworn officer of the court and expected to abide by laws specific to their role and profession.

Other court professionals knew of the predatory conduct in the Augusta area, and even discussed it amongst themselves in writing. They did nothing about it, and especially did nothing to address the twisted and harmful outcomes of cases, let alone the damages to the victims and their children. Of course the man eventually left the role of Guardian but was never held accountable and there was no investigation or relief for the families and children.

What happened?

The Guardian ad Litem chosen to sway the court in favor of one parent and against another used his position to coerce sexual favors from women subjected to his authority in their child custody litigation. In at least one case where the Guardian was complied with, the mother obtained custody when she was not the safe parent. That means the father in that case lost custody in spite of the evidence of the mother’s problems – endangering the children when they were in her care. Of course the father had no way of knowing that the mother of his children was being sexually harassed and assaulted by the GAL who influenced the court against him.

In many more cases involving abusive conduct by the Guardian, mothers who would not give in to his advances lost their children. In at least two cases, the children were forced to live with a parent who was psychologically abusive and potentially dangerous to them given issues with addiction and rage. Those mothers and their children were harmed badly as a result of this Guardian’s influence with judges and attorneys managing the cases, but there has been no recourse for them in either civil or criminal cases.

Even with news coverage of these cases and the pervasive sexual exploitation and fraud on the court, nothing was done about it. It was said by law enforcement that no crime occurred, that there was nothing the agency could do, and a judge actually just referred to the misconduct as “harassment,” saying, “sexual harassment isn’t a crime in Georgia.”

If a court-appointed Guardian ad Litem is not held accountable for such abusive conduct, and is allowed to freely abuse such power in this position of trust and control, what does that say about our system for determining what is in a child’s best interests? Can any parent expect to have their rights upheld when it comes to staying in a child’s life or having the ability to protect their children who are in harm’s way?

Taking it a step further, if such predatory conduct by a court-appointed Guardian is to go unpunished while the lawyers bill for the work going on around this conduct, what else, what other forms of abuse, were being perpetrated against victims of abuse? Were the professionals in this area aware of other abusive conduct and staying silent, or worse?

With Georgia’s extremely high rates of child sexual abuse, exploitation and trafficking, the issues raised here should not just be filed away. These are not isolated incidents but indicators of bigger problems in the legal system and in our state.

Predatory conduct and the mindset of those in power who avoid holding perpetrators accountable make for a very dangerous combination. *If you can’t be protected from sexual assault when you enter the court system, where can you expect to be protected?

 

CORPORATE MALFEASANCE AND COVERUPS

The story below is connected to a recently resolved criminal case and ongoing civil matter in Georgia. Both sides of the story are troublesome and raise issues of accountability for wrongdoing; it appears that there is no perfect answer, no one clear resolution in store. I’ll say for now that one crime does not justify another, but it will be up to the jury and court to determine if secretly video-taping inside another person’s home is a punishable offense in this particular situation.

April 11, 2018, update: the jury acquitted the defendants today on all charges. Read more in the Daily Report here.

The purpose of sharing this information here is to highlight the mindset of sexual predators and lack of accountability for their misconduct, as well the extreme challenges for victims of abuse in seeking relief. Currently, there are no criminal investigations into any form of sexual abuse related to these parties that I’m aware of. News media, especially the legal news media, are only focused on the gyrations of the criminal trial for eavesdropping violations by the alleged victim of sexual abuse.

Updates on this trial are being reported by Robin McDonald with the Daily Report/ALM. For the latest as of Monday, April 9th, click here.

This update reveals the detective who tried to look into the allegations of sexual abuse by the employer stated that no crime was committed, but he was also unable to conduct a thorough investigation due to records being sealed and ongoing civil actions wherein parties and lawyers did not want to talk openly. Allegedly the court issued a gag order preventing the housekeeper from speaking about the matter. Police Lt. Carben Tyus pointed out that the existence of a parallel civil case does not, as a rule, impede a criminal investigation. “They are often simultaneous,” he said, adding that criminal prosecutions often take precedence over civil cases. It seems that one of the issues raised was that the alleged victim waited months before reporting, and produced no evidence of a crime, only narrative about the civil litigation.

BACKGROUND

In Texas, a woman was fired in retaliation for reporting severe and prolonged sexual harassment and assault by her co-workers and supervisors. When she left and started her own business, her business was attacked to cause her loss of income. I didn’t know about this case and the federal court’s scathing opinion of the predatory and retaliatory conduct until April of 2018 because it was introduced in the aforementioned criminal trial of a woman and lawyer involved in confronting the former Waffle House chief executive. Regardless of the outcomes of these cases, the information and federal court judge’s response to this abusive behavior are noteworthy, timeless and should be preserved.  We shouldn’t just move on from this like it’s another headline to be forgotten.

This is worth repeating:

Predatory conduct and the mindset of those in power who avoid holding perpetrators accountable make for a very dangerous combination. *If you can’t be protected from sexual assault or harassment in your place of work, where can you expect to be protected?

What allowed the entitled and predatory mindset seen in both of the above situations is pervasive and causing our society to rot from the inside out. It’s about a lack of humanity and empathy, the notion that people are there for the taking, there to be exploited and profited from in some way, no matter the cost.

After publishing this post, I dug a little further to find this AJC article from several years ago when the Waffle House “sex video” and the cross-claims were in the news; this was before the recent criminal case gained momentum. It provides added perspective which I believe is missing from the recent coverage of the criminal trial.

This is what followers of the Waffle House CEO Sex Tape “scandal” and the resulting civil and criminal cases are not hearing about:

  • In 1998, a U.S. district court judge in Texas ruled in favor of a former Waffle House personnel recruiter who alleged repeated sexual harassment at the hands of her superiors.

He, the chief executive, “… either condoned the wrongful conduct of (top Waffle House executives ) or sanctioned it in advance,” wrote the judge, who awarded former Waffle House personnel recruiter $8.1 million. The district judge’s written decision was later “vacated” by the court as part of a confidential settlement between Waffle House and the woman. (her name is redacted to keep the focus on the patterns of conduct relevant to this article)

  • The former recruiter agreed to support the woman in this present case, stating, “I think it’s important for this case that people realize that the power (he) has and the personality he has, how he could coerce someone to do what she did over all those years,” she testified. “And she, unlike I, could not just walk out and get another job.”

“You know, if a boss invites you to have sex or do sexual things, you always have to wonder what will happen if you say no,” she said.  The man who was her boss, she said, is “a bully. I find him to be someone who preys on others weaker than he is.”

As it turns out, the woman who did report repeated sexual harassment was terminated, with no record against her to justify the termination.

  • Classic victim-blaming:

“She was a jilted lover with an axe to grind,” said the lawyer for the former executive. The lawyer also stated that prior claims of sexual abuse or harassment are irrelevant in the current case.

I’ll leave you with one last thought for now: the situations featured here involve clear and compelling evidence of abuse, as well as evidence of failures by professionals and authorities to properly respond.

If such well documented abuse, exploitation and betrayal cannot lead to accountability and protection, what does this mean for victims of abuse – including children who are sexually exploited – where there is less evidence?

What other forms of misconduct, including retaliation for reporting, are being endorsed and covered up by corporations? What about by our courts?

Can you expect your own family members and children to be kept safe?

 

Sexual Harassment: Scribner v. Waffle House, Inc., 976 F. Supp. 439 (N.D. Tex. 1997) via Justia by Deb Beacham on Scribd

Fatalities in Georgia related to Stalking: Annual Report 2017

Georgia’s Commission on Family Violence and the Coalition Against Domestic Violence provide us each year with an annual report that is more than just stats, it’s a roadmap to saving lives. The 2017 report focuses on stalking and is a must read for all responders and advocates. It’s especially important for victims and family members or friends of victims.

 

Georgia Domestic Violence – Fatality Review Annual Report 2017 by Deb Beacham on Scribd

Perpetrator of Domestic Violence Commits Murder-Suicide

A nationwide extradition order for Kelley James McDonald Jr. wasn’t enough to stop him from showing up in Georgia to murder his victim and her sister. Fortunately the three children involved are still alive, but two of the three are hospitalized with injuries including a gunshot wound to the teen girl.

McDonald was on the run for the last two weeks according to local Tampa news sources before locating his target and murdering her and her sister before taking his own life.

Law enforcement is still searching for the driver of a Ford Explorer believed to have traveled with McDonald. The color of the vehicle is described as gold or champagne.

The two year-old child injured at the house during the murders is McDonald’s own child. As is typical of perpetrators of domestic violence, harming what is believed to be his own child was apparently not a concern of McDonald. A sixteen year-old girl was shot and needed surgery.

Lumpkin County Sheriff shared with Georgia news media including WSB-TV that the deaths in north Georgia stemmed from a domestic abuse situation in Florida.

However, it’s important to point out that what occurred in Florida showed clear intent to cause permanent harm. The perpetrator did not just act “in the heat of the moment.” He broke in and attempted murder by strangulation.

Domestic abuse is too generic a term for what escalated into murder in this case. The criminal report specifically state battery by strangulation and burglary with assault/battery.

The AJC reported that the Sheriff is trying to determine how McDonald made it to the home to take their lives. In the meantime, we need to better educate victims and the public on ways to identify the kind of behavior that leads to loss of life. Sometimes there is a weapon involved, like a gun or maybe a knife as in the Kristofak murder in Cobb County after John Kristofak was let out of jail only 7 months into his four year sentence. In other instances the murderous mind uses others in an attempt to keep his hands clean and his reputation intact, such as was the case with Fred Tokars. Sometimes the perpetrator stops just short of murder, leaving the victim severely injured and suffering for a lifetime.

But we know enough about these deviants of society who desire to do harm to their victims, no matter the cost.

McDonald’s victim, the mother of his child, was right to leave the state of Florida and flee to Georgia to shelter with family. Unfortunately, she likely believed that she and her family would be safe from him. He was able to obtain access to another vehicle and show up at the residence of a family member to find and kill her.

In sharing this story, I encourage anyone who is battered by another to take the warnings very seriously. If you are subjected to cruelty and aware that a perpetrator will not hold back on causing you injury just because children are present, this is a solid indicator that greater harm will follow.

When a perpetrator is determined to locate the victim, he or she will likely employ whatever tactics can be managed, whether legal or not.

 

To news media and law enforcement:

This is not just another unfortunate incident or shocking murder story. Please let it be a wake-up call – – call it what it is and don’t soften the descriptives.

When a perpetrator of any form of criminal act involving domestic violence, abuse, cruelty, stalking – whatever label is used – shows you who he is, follow through. Protect the victim and the children. Communicate and engage in ways to keep the victim’s location secured and private.  Deal more harshly at the first sign that the perpetrator is not concerned about accountability.

Let’s not merely be busy or shocked and dismayed, but moved to prevent the next tragedy and loss of life. These children needed their mother to be kept safe. They need what they can no longer have.

We know the warning signs, we have the laws, but do we have the willpower and stamina to stay after those with cruel, destructive mindsets to stop them?

 

Photo courtesy of WSB-TV investigative reporter Mike Petchenik.

 

Georgia Political Update: Victim Protection and Perpetrator Accountability

Many of our citizens believe that protection for victims is the battle cry only heard from the progressive side of the aisle, but in this past legislative session I learned about the role of the Georgia Baptist Mission Board and how conservative values drove policy reform efforts to better serve victims of abuse and to improve safety and stability for our citizens.

One of the things that stood out for me is that the Georgia Baptist Mission acknowledged its members have as much to lose as other religious groups from extending statutes of limitations for suing not only sexual predators but also the entities that enabled and/or covered for the predator. In spite of this financial and public exposure risk, the Baptist leadership stated firmly its position to seek better protection for the vulnerable and real accountability for perpetrators of child exploitation.

This is not a liberal or conservative issue, nor is it a characteristic of one party or another.

It is resoundingly a matter of right versus wrong.

We need more of this form of advocacy, this type of integrity and leadership. We need more people across society to loudly and firmly, “No,” to putting profit over protection. In my work and social engagement, online and offline, I’ll continue to acknowledge and support good work by those on all sides of political, faith, protection and enforcement issues. The more we all pull together and close the divides that exist around this problem, the faster we save lives and stop abuses of all forms.

The topics of predatory behavior, the lack of transparency and accountability for perpetrators, the lack of protection for children and adult victims of abuse, and the extreme difficulty for victims and survivors to recover are ones I’ve been studying, analyzing and reporting on for years. I’ll continue this work far into the future, specifically focused on solutions that both prevent and assist in recovery.

I’m especially grateful to all participating actively and investing in creating change in this area of our society. Thank you for standing up, speaking out, and showing up repeatedly and demonstrating your commitment to improving safety and allowing for recovery.

In this section below, I’ve included an excerpt of the legislative update from the Georgia Baptist Mission Board’s Public Affairs team:

SEXUAL ABUSE

“On a positive side was legislation like HB 732, sponsored by Rep. Deborah Silcox, that increases fines and penalties for pandering and solicitation for sex trafficking. These are the “middle men” who are out there drumming up business for pimps and johns. This legislation is needed to crack down on all who are a part of sexual exploitation of individuals for sex trafficking in our state. See GBC resolution on this issue https://gabaptist.egnyte.com/dl/JTaByb5jS7/RESOLUTION_ON_HUMAN_TRAFFICKING.PDF_ .

Rep. Jason Spencer addresses the topic of sexual predators at a press conference. MIKE GRIFFIN/Index

A bill that caused a sizable amount of controversy had to do with HB 605, The Hidden Predator Act. This bill, sponsored by Rep. Jason Spencer, (https://christianindex.org/children-hidden-predator-act-2018/ ) passed the House by a 170-0 vote. The bill basically allowed the statute of limitations to be extended to allow victims of child sex abuse to sue entities who had covered up child sexual abuse in the past. The bill was severely amended in the Senate. (https://christianindex.org/legislative-update-georgia-hidden-predator-act/ ) It was amended so much that there was very little legal remedy left for those whose statute of limitations had run out for criminal prosecution.  This legislation was introduced in the context of the legal cases regarding the Boy Scouts, The Catholic Church and USA Gymnastics.

Georgia Baptists supported this bill because we felt that it struck a balance in allowing the victims to sue, and the rights of the entities to defend themselves. However, because of the severe amending done by the Senate, the House did not agree with their version. The Senate would not appoint a conference committee and the House would not agree to the changes and the bill, therefore, died. This is a sad outcome for these victims/survivors of child sexual abuse.”

 

Let me know about your involvement in these issues and how I can better support you by contacting me here, and by connecting and engaging on social media.

Thank you,

Deb Beacham

My Advocate Center on Twitter

Facebook Advocacy

 

Advocates for Open Government and Open Records

Today was a fascinating day in the world of justice as I watched a packed courtroom full of people wait on the sentence issued by the Dawson County judge in Nydia Tisdale’s case.

There should have been no case to begin with, but since this was taken to a jury trial it became obvious that Tisdale had the most far-reaching and compelling support you likely have ever seen in a courtroom. Her legal team did outstanding work and Tisdale herself was like a beacon of bright light in that courtroom. That’s what the truth does, it shines.

Please watch WSB-TV in Atlanta at 6pm for the story and I’ll update this post soon with links to news reports, images and documents from this case as it will mean a great deal to all of us – as Nydia and her journalistic work will – for a long time to come!

With much gratitude to the Tisdale team lawyers, the politicians and other officials who testified on her behalf today, members of the press and many more who brought transparency into this trial and the issues in play, it is my request to you as you read this that you donate here to help Nydia Tisdale continue her priceless public service.

Follow via Twitter, @MPetchenikWSB for updates on this story, along with Chris Joyner @cjoyner and @alexisnews of the AJC and Robin McDonald of the Daily Report.

Deb Beacham