Justice in Georgia

When the endorsement of Judge Kathy Schrader by my Georgia non-profit corporation was announced in social media during the primary election leading up to the June 9th victory, so many great stories were surfacing about her leadership and integrity that it was impossible to report to you about every interview and statement at that time. The stories are remarkable and need to be heard well beyond any political campaign.

This video of James, a father who would be in jail over incorrect child support claims but for Judge Kathryn Schrader, is one of my favorite stories that came out of months of getting to know this community better. Listen to what James has to say about his experience with Judge Schrader and how she saved his life (James’ words).

What I learned through observing and studying the professionals who have appeared in Judge Schrader’s courtroom and argued on behalf of parents and others drawn into litigation is that this is a jurist who upholds the law and who sets the best example possible for other legal professionals. There is much to learn and share about the many ways this happens, but you should know that it matters a great deal to our community and to our state how judges treat the issues, the people caught in conflict and how judges interact with the professionals appearing before them. It will make or break you if your judge believes in “Justice for All” and follows through on that belief. I know.

For the days ahead, as Gwinnett County nears its runoff election date of August 11th, with the judicial race joining a few others in heated battles, I’m going to focus on what professionals, parents, people in treatment and news media outlets are saying. Of course, I hope you will listen to Judge Schrader herself as her voice is the strongest, the reason we need her to remain on the bench in the Superior Court of Gwinnett County.

The legal news source, Daily Report Online (an ALM publication), reported that Judge Schrader is prepared to continue hearing cases very soon.

Schrader, who voluntarily stepped aside while her case is pending, said she is prepared to get back to court “as soon as I am reelected.”

This is great news for all Gwinnett residents and for the lawyers guiding clients through often treacherous legal territory.

The statements printed in the Daily Report as Judge Schrader’s responses to questions asked by the managing editor Jonathan Ringel include promises made and kept by Judge Schrader. These statements below are supported by the testimony of litigants, lawyers and advocates from across Gwinnett’s community as seen on Judge Schrader’s video channels and social media. The proof of her leadership and integrity come from people who have experienced the positive and even extraordinary outcomes.

Upon taking office, Schrader said she promised to treat litigants in her court with “honor, respect, equality and dignity” and endeavor to disrupt “cycles of abuse and violence.”

“I delivered on those promises and more,” she said, noting her work in Gwinnett’s accountability courts. She most recently presided over the Parent Accountability Court before stepping away from her duties last October as the criminal case against her neared trial.

Another compelling and informative interview with Judge Schrader was aired on Gwinnett RadioX, hosted by Rick Strawn on his show “Case on Point.” If you want to learn a lot directly from Judge Schrader in a short period of time, this is a great place to start. Listen to the Business RadioX podcast on Apple or by clicking on the video below.

Thank you for spending time learning about what Justice for All means and why I believe Judge Kathy Schrader should be re-elected and supported with everything we’ve got!

Deborah Beacham

On the Home Front…

Is your home secure during your divorce or after divorce?

Having a home may be considered more of a luxury than ever before, now with the loss of income during the coronavirus pandemic being added to the drain on families caused by litigation expenses.

Are you or someone you know at risk of losing a home because of court expenses such as high attorney’s fees and bankruptcy? If you are post-divorce, are you afraid you will not be able to afford to keep your home after spending so much during the case, especially if child custody was disputed?

Our hope is that with Georgia courts being temporarily closed for health preservation, that more people will stop, learn and listen so that they can avoid further loss and injury related to child custody and divorce litigation. This applies especially to parents who are usually so busy with their child’s school and sports activities to learn what they might be missing in terms of resolving conflict and protecting a child in need of attention.

A few tips:

  1. Save all of your lawyer’s emails as PDF’s and put in a folder. If you can make searchable PDF’s, that is even better. If there are communications between your lawyer and other professionals involved in your case that you have not been copied on, meaning the entire email exchange was not forwarded to you, this is another issue to raise, and one for which you may need to obtain help.
  2. Create a sub-folder for emails, letters, pleadings related to financial matters, including costs of litigation and strategy pertaining to homes and other property. Pay attention, especially, to any communication that hints at a trade-off around child custody and property.
  3. Write out questions about any wording or issue you are not absolutely certain about as to meaning and the effect on your family.
  4. Print out all billing statements from your lawyer and other other professionals involved in the litigation; compare records for duplicates or any other sign of over-billing. Print your contract with professionals and read it carefully, and compare what you agreed to with what you have been billed for – this is a learning process.
  5. If your lawyer has not provided you with detailed billing statements and in a timely manner, this may be an issue you want to raise with the State Bar or a local Bar Association in your area.
  6. Look for and ask about communications specific to your property and how awards around marital division, homes, accounts/debt, and attorney’s fees and other expenses are being handled.

Sometimes, it is what you do not see or do not know (yet) that you need to look for, which may mean asking your lawyer to ensure that you have an unedited copy of every single email/text and document related to your interests and case. With some lawyers, it is not until a specific request is made, for example to have a copy of your entire legal file made, that you do not realize what else may be going on, or not going on, that you should know about. While we do not provide legal advice, we do know which lawyers will give you straight answers and help you fill in missing pieces of the picture.

Examples of Issues to Watch Out for:

  • Do you have equity in your home? Involved in marital dispute over division of equity? Learn more from real estate agents and financial advisors so that all of your understanding is not reliant on your domestic lawyer’s perspective.
  • Are you at risk for having to file for bankruptcy? Make sure to consult with a bankruptcy lawyer separate and apart from your domestic lawyer, and ideally not with one referred by your domestic lawyer.
  • Is your partner/spouse or former spouse/partner at risk of filing for bankruptcy – or in bankruptcy? If yes, then you may want to consult with a bankruptcy lawyer yourself, and also separate and apart from your domestic lawyer.

Could this be you or someone you know? Is your home at risk?

Conflicts have been seen with domestic lawyers where property division and fees are concerned, such as:

  1. In Cobb County: after three years of convoluted litigation, attorneys discussed with the judge how the court expenses would be covered. It turned out that from the judge’s perspective, there really was no need for all the legal battles that were waged – there was no dispute and no decisions for the judge to make when they appeared in court for a “hearing,” so the judge looked at the lawyers, and both sides (lawyer for the mother and the opposing counsel for the father) flushed red. Before that moment the only focus was on which parent had more equity in their pre-marital home as the attorneys wanted the judge to issue an order about who was paying what attorney’s fees (and guardian ad litem fees). What came out is that the case was not about the children, but about how long the case could be dragged out to increase the fees; clearly the lawyers knew there was equity in the homes to take – and they did. Both the mother and the father appeared to not realize what was going on and neither knew how to protect themselves, or how to avoid losing equity or property.

2. Recently in Gwinnett County: a divorcing couple with children went through marital division of assets and the fees incurred were extraordinarily high, well over $50,000, which is not unusual.

In order to get a judgment in his client’s favor on financial support and fees, the mother’s lawyer decided to falsify the father’s income in pleadings to be higher than reality, an act that set the father on course for bankruptcy; this is also not uncommon. Maybe the mother was so busy managing the children that she did not realize her fees were being unnecessarily driven up by a lawyer misrepresenting numbers to the court, and did not realize this would ultimately cost her more than it helped her and their children.

The mother likely did not learn on her own what using inflated numbers could mean for her, and therein lies the risk. She probably trusted her lawyer to only serve her interests and not put the home in jeopardy.

When her lawyer pursued the father to collect the attorney’s fees of over $50,000 and the bankruptcy court became involved, it was revealed that the lawyer did not protect his client and the marital home could be forced into a sale and used to cover the fees driven up by the lawyer; of course, the mother may have no way of knowing she could lose the house. If she believes that her lawyer’s collection efforts are “normal” and not putting her at risk, she may be caught off guard. In this case, the lawyer failed to have the father removed as owner of the property, so as it is a part of the estate, it can be used to cover debts. This situation and others like it are why our founder, Deborah Beacham, observes lawyers in courtrooms, studies transcripts, billing records and orders, and encourages parents to learn more in advance and to try to resolve as much outside of the courtroom as possible. Situations like this one are also why she engages legal malpractice lawyers in discussions – education and preparation are key to preventing the kind of shock and loss going on in this example.

3. In another metro Atlanta divorce, the mother’s lawyer helped her stage and provoke a stressful situation they called “domestic violence,” so that the father would have to leave his pre-marital home; the litigation was dragged out for years, with multiple professionals involved to run up fees & turn what could have been a straightforward resolution into a high conflict mess.

Not only did positive co-parenting go out the window, putting much greater stress and shame on the child, but because of the way the father was set up, falsely accused and kept from his home office and equipment, his business failed; the total loss that followed resulted in his business partner giving up hope and taking his life. From where we sit, studying hundreds of similar situations all around Georgia and in other states, this loss of life – and the loss of a small business and loss of the father’s home due to attorney’s fees – was avoidable.

What could have been saved if this family learned to get the right kind of help before entering into the legal process? Everything.

Unfortunately, the above examples barely scratch the surface in explaining what families and children are experiencing. In a better, safer world, parents will be more informed and prepared to avoid such outcomes.

Solutions are available to protect children, homes and reputations.
~ Deborah Beacham

Let’s start here. By raising awareness and building legal protection funds, we can guide parents to safety, and stop the current trend of destabilizing families and children.

We can save homes, jobs and health, and most importantly, the parent-child bonds that children need to thrive.

Life away from a loving mother. The new norm.

We agree that a shift was needed to make it more likely that fathers would be involved, actively involved, in the lives of their children after divorce. Agreed, it should not be an automatic decision that a mother would have sole custody and all decision-making rights.

What is happening in our culture in the effort to ‘level the playing field’ for fathers is that we’ve gone very far astray in serving the needs of children for the sake of gaming, in some form, what a natural outcome should be when there are two loving, safe parents eager to care for their children. Ensuring that fathers are involved and that shared parenting is supported is a great thing, for sure. The unfortunate reality, though, is that some lawyers are hiding behind “father’s rights” to profit from completely eradicating mothers from the children’s lives.

Children are being taught that it is normal for their mother (or father) to be ‘gone’ from their lives because ‘that’s how it went in court.’ It is often not because the mother or father is ‘unfit’ or unavailable; it is not for lack of interest but rather about what increases the fees in the case. Would you fight back if a disadvantage was created for you and that disadvantage meant being cut out and cut off from parenting your children? Of course, you would!

So, if you’re a loving mother with young children depending on you every day, including around facilitating a pleasant and warm relationship with their father, you are at great risk of not only being undermined and challenged but of losing your children if you do not play along.

The story that circulated about these boys a few years back was disturbing and shocking. Their father paid a psychologist to make false allegations against their mother so that his new wife could incorporate the boys’ residency in the USVI on her application for a tax shelter for her hedge fund. We’re learning more about child trafficking and how much money is paid to help avoid accountability, so this is a story that is finally finding its voice. For now, my point is: assume nothing and figure out what it is that you need to know about litigation, especially when children are involved.

Next, help set the standards higher and don’t be afraid to speak about what makes sense and about what children really need!

This, what we saw done to these boys in Newnan, Georgia, is not what good men do; it is not what good fathers do to their children. Good men (and good women) do not tear apart and isolate their children because it makes financial sense for them. When ‘legal strategy’ is inserted, though, it can change perspective and make people react in ways they otherwise would not react. Parents are distracted and led to believe “this is normal,” and if you want (x) then you have to “play the game.”

Once parents become caught up in this, they lose focus of what makes sense for their children and forget that they previously were leading their children to have strong relationships with the other parent in spite of spousal differences. Winning becomes the priority and the impact on children gets lost.

When this happens, children are deceived. Deprived is the right word. [Please feel free to reverse wording to show it is women forcing good men out of the lives of their children; it works both ways, but always because there is a lawyer or two, and often a custody ‘expert’ aiding in reaching a pre-determined outcome that harms children.]

This is not the time or place for debating alienating tactics but rather calling attention to the shocking number of times a caregiver parent, the parent holding the fort down, handling all the ordinary needs and day to day routines and soothing the upset tummies and listening to the tall tales (and cleaning up after the furry tails) is shoved to the side because of litigation abuse. It’s not about who is more involved or “better,” but about what happens when favors are done in litigation for the purpose of enabling and increasing profits for the professionals controlling the litigation between parents.

I have the authority to talk on this subject this way because I have intervened and advocated for nearly as many fathers as I have mothers, simply because I am focused uniquely on what children need and on what some professionals will do to the entire family when there is no accountability for their actions.

The most simple analogy I can give you is a story in legal news about a car repair shop that took in vehicles for repair and instead of fixing the problem as presented, the man in control took the vehicle and smashed it up a bit more so he could collect more for the repairs. The title of the article about his prosecution read “Bumping up the damages,” and that is exactly what occurs in far too many domestic situations.

What lawyers, guardians and psychologists are ignoring is that this approach is life-threatening to children. Fueling fires to keep parents fighting rather than holding accountable, establishing boundaries and motivating them to stop fighting carries obvious consequences for the parents and for the children, but it doesn’t seem to matter. Not yet anyway.

Will you join me in changing this trend that removes loving parents from children without cause?

The approach of increasing damages to increase profits, like with the car repair shop, is what I refer to as ‘profit over protection,’ a strategy that puts the needs of the children and rights of parents below – way below – the financial interests, the billings and relationships between certain lawyers and guardians and/or psychologists who determine where children should live and which parent should have decision-making. Yes, it’s a tough and often unpopular topic of discussion, but one we need to have if we really want to stabilize children and families and set them up to succeed.

Let’s talk!

Deborah Beacham

Founder, My Advocate Center, Inc.

Follow me on Twitter: @DebBeachamATL or @MyAdvocateCentr

Image take from courtroom video of a judge speaking with parents at the end of a several year dispute over young children. It took two times for the Court of Appeals to reverse a decision and three lawyers for the father to overcome the harsh practices on the other side designed to keep this father out of the lives of the children. I’ve made this photo about the judge and the American flag rather than about the faces of the parents and the grandmother because we saw that day, with the camera rolling, that just and reasonable outcomes are possible. My challenge to you? Do what you can to ensure children do not have to go years without a parent who is available, safe and ready to care for the children.

Solve problems. I dare you.

Grooming. Hedge Fund Style.

Grooming is no longer a word you should use in your budget or financial affidavit for litigation. It is associated with snagging the attention of victims and preparing them for servitude. It is taking away modesty and boundaries that keep children and young women safe. Grooming means to normalize unwanted sexual experiences, including pornography and sexual assault. It is putting children in a position where they must not resist and then they lose inhibitions and the internal call to resist and leave. This is how sex traffickers succeed. Grooming includes desensitizing the child to what is happening, giving it a name that makes it seem acceptable and not an offense that should be reported.

Grooming can include turning children into predators, rewarding them for engaging and being aggressive towards other children. Sometimes children become the recruiters, as is the case with Epstein’s stable of victims.

The seasoned woman attached to Jeffrey Epstein is reported as having fallen off the social scene in New York but what she did to girls should be on our radar and in our minds from now on. We not only need to be on the lookout for those who sexually exploit and abuse children but also those who win them over and groom them for sex acts and slavery. [listen in news reports for titles to books ordered by Epstein]

That is the role Ms. Maxwell appears to have served, at least one of them. Groomer of young girls. The stories about Epstein and Maxwell are tough to stomach, but salacious enough given celebrity status with homes around the globe that media will continue expanding on the details. It’s time.

I believe justice can still be served for the young women reeled in, groomed and exploited by the accomplice, a polished and privileged woman who charmed everyone in her social circles. I believe in not giving up.

I’m proud of my hometown paper for being the driver in the exposure of this sex trafficking enterprise dominated by hedge fund mogul Jeffrey Epstein and I’m grateful to Julie K. Brown for not letting go. The Miami Herald published this scathing story about the leniency given to Epstein despite the number of girls and substantial and overwhelming evidence.

This is going to be a deep dive for media, as seen here on Fox News, and for child sex trafficking authorities for quite some time, but what I hope for you is that you become empowered to speak up and do more in your community to help vulnerable children and teens stay safe and confident enough to avoid those who groom children for the perpetrators of sexual abuse.

Go here for the Timeline of sexual abuse history and prosecution of Epstein according to Fox News.

Next? Be offended at how easy it is for some to avoid serious punishment for harming children. “We were little girls.” This part is easy: get involved.

The harder part is staying with the case and pushing through the politics when people of influence are able “change minds” of prosecutors or judges and circumvent justice for their victims. This is a major problem for society as this happens often, more often than you would like to think.

Thank you to all who are interested in getting out in front of child exploitation and in supporting family stability. The girls talk about how vulnerable they were and reporters talk about family dysfunction as a major factor in making these vulnerable to being tricked and groomed into becoming a part of this world.

We can do better. Visit GaCares.org to learn more about commercialized sexual exploitation of our youth. Be aware of people who blend in but who may be the one creating the most risk.

Keep in mind also that there are other ways children are trafficked and exploited; financial gain is not only derived from sexual abuse when children can be held hostage and silenced. Any time children can be used as commodities by hedge fund owners and their lawyers, we should step in.

What are others saying about his lair in the Virgin Islands?

‘It’s our dark corner’: Jeffrey Epstein’s ‘Pedophile Island’ no secret on St. Thomas

Based on my experience in witnessing how children were used illegally to increase profits in the Virgin Islands, on St. Thomas and with the help of the former governor investigated for misconduct and ousted, I believe there is more to this part of Epstein’s network and story. Were other hedge fund owners and other women involved? It’s worth a closer look. As the headline says, it’s a “dark corner.”

Share cases involving exploitation of youth where the predators are known to the children by using the contact form above.

Deb Beacham

Due Process is a Thing?

Why would I question whether or not due process, fairness protected by law, truly matters to our courts?

My question stems from a critical problem in domestic law, especially in child custody cases, because laws governing fairness and constitutional rights so often are not applied in family conflict. Parents are stunned, many to the point of feeling disabled and hopeless, and left wondering why reasonable notice and the ability to present evidence and defend themselves are rights that seem not to matter during what is called “civil” litigation.

When parents are deprived of basic rights in legal disputes, any sense of civility goes out the window. It is a horrific shock to a loving parent to find out too late that due process, the rights which can easily make or break a parent’s ability to be involved in their children’s lives, seems to not have a place in the trial courts where children are divided much like a 401k.

Fairness to a parent entering family court is like gloss over an attention-grabbing ad campaign to make it seem safe to enter a legal process as a parent. The gloss, however, fades after one makes it far enough in past the storefront for reality to set in. It is not just a disappointment when laws providing for a fair process are not applied, it is traumatic.

In watching the video of the oral argument shown below, you’ll see that the Georgia Court of Appeals panel is quite passionate about this subject.

What I’ve observed in person in many child custody cases makes no sense in light of that passion.

That due process is missing, even unknown to many parents and children, including teens who believed they had a right to choose their primary parent, is one of the reasons I believe in being able to film in courtrooms, which I do often by filing a request to record as permitted by USCR 22 (Rule 22). Even with the revised Rule 22 seeming to encourage more widespread use of recordings, when done properly, there is still much effort in some courts to provide cover for the kind of statements and attitudes revealed in this video of the argument in the Georgia Court of Appeals. In every situation where a lawyer has objected to my request to record, the proceeding yielded an opportunity for that lawyer’s client to benefit from a lack of transparency. In every proceeding where a request to record has been denied in accord with the objection, an injustice, a lack of fairness towards a safe, loving parent, hung in the air like a heavy, mold-laden curtain. This may sound overly dramatic or even unrealistic, but when you watch the Judges’ responses in this video, you’ll understand I’m right on point.

I’ve actually heard lawyers in domestic circles say that due process does not matter or does not exist in family law, even though there are rules and there is plenty of case law that talks about the ramifications if a party is deprived of due process, if a specific civil right is denied. How can lawyers have this attitude that conflicts so dramatically with the beliefs of appellate court judges? How can due process not be “thing” if Judge Dillard and other Judges in the Court of Appeals react as they do in oral argument below?

After years of seeing enormous, life-altering – and in a bad way for children and safe, loving parents – voids (a black hole likely to allow no safe return) when it comes to having opportunity to be heard and having rulings, let alone timely rulings, I was encouraged to see this issue argued so passionately in our Court of Appeals. I saw it because a news media team featured it on The Reveal, a unique show produced by Atlanta’s 11 Alive, and I hope it makes its way to the eyeballs, through the brains and into the hearts of our domestic lawyers and family court judges. Yes, I believe anything is possible.

Grab a seat and be ready to take notes. For sure send your comments through social media or contact me here.

Follow the Court of Appeals online and watch for cases that involve issues of due process, fairness and civil rights that yield family stability and protect mental health. How many more arguments of this kind would you like to see in our appellate courts where you can learn directly from our Judges this way?

I’m especially appreciative of the fact that our appellate courts in Georgia allow filming of oral argument, and I’d like to provide more coverage of such cases in the Court of Appeals to see reactions to similar due process issues.

As a lawyer or judge, ask the tough questions about the case before you; dare to spend extra time checking your work as it applies to due process. If you have a case you believe is heading towards oral argument which involves parental rights, I’d like to know.

What if more arguments like this resulted in relief that restores parent-child bonds and ensures due process in child custody and other domestic matters? Would that be a good thing for our society?

I think we can expect a great impact on our culture and in our communities by paying attention here, so please send me a note with a case number once docketed in the appellate court. If you know of a lawyer who has argued before the Court of Appeals to ensure due process is afforded to parents and children, please make an introduction or share the standout points made and how the Court reacted.

Relief. That is what due process would provide should it be restored to parents and children relying on our laws to protect their right to be together and to be safe from harm.

Thank you for taking time to read and to watch Georgia’s Court of Appeals make trend-changing statements in this case!

Deborah Beacham

Can My Experience with Child Custody Experts Help Others?

Have you faced family conflict in Georgia that resulted in child custody litigation?

If you have, then the chance is pretty high you have something to say about your experience and may even want your experience to be useful in improving the process for others.

If you believe the process is overused and/or can be improved for the sake of increasing safety, peace of mind and availability of nurturing parents for children, your answers are especially important.

Regardless of where you are in the process, what the outcome has been, or even if it is not your experience but that of a family member or friend, your input is valuable in shaping the future of conflict resolution.

Please complete the form below and use the Contact Us form if you have any questions. Thank you!

Thank you, Congress, for Putting Child Safety First!

Important update!

Congress passed House Conc. Resolution 72 on September 24th, late into the evening.

This was a bipartisan effort with tireless support from child advocates, lawyers and legislators from across the country. This was a tremendous first step toward improving safety, mental health and family stability for children!

Watch this video courtesy of C-SPAN to hear what Representatives from both the Republican and Democratic parties have to say about this new mandate to states and courts. The video is linked in the previous sentence. To comment on this legislation and story, please use the Contact form here.

My Advocate Center supports Georgia Courts in improving child safety and mental health.

Why did My Advocate Center begin publishing information about this proposed resolution back in April of 2018?  The answer: child safety and emotional well-being should always be the first priority of every legal matter involving children. Always. Most of us, however, could not fathom that this has NOT been the case; in fact, the true needs of children, including protection from an abusive parent, are often ignored.

You’ve seen the news reports, heard the stories and talked about it on social media, or maybe only quietly shared it with your counselor when privately grieving what has happened to you or to your loved ones.

The next step for Georgians is to ask our policy leaders to help create momentum on this issue. Please sign the petition below and get to know your U.S. Representatives by sharing your experience with them.

What is the overall goal?

Keeping our children safe, our families stable and healthy, protecting our rights as parents and grandparents to care for our own children. To do this, we need to improve how our courts and legal professionals manage family disputes that enter the the legal system.

Did you know? We reached over 1000 signatures on our previous petition, so just imagine what we can do now!

What is Stalking and Why is it a Dangerous Crime?

The Fatality Review Annual Report for 2017 addresses misconceptions about stalking and explains why it is a much more dangerous crime, connecting to more deaths of domestic violence victims, than most people realize.

Stalking involves a course of conduct by the perpetrator that is meant to cause fear and uncertainty or an expectation of harm in the victim. It is often an unseen or almost invisible crime, but the danger lurking around the corner or in the shadows is always a sign of trauma and injury to follow.

This course of conduct is also found in civil cases where one party – the aggressor or perpetrator of crimes paying to avoid accountability and block protection for the victim and children involved – uses stalking tactics to destabilize the victim. It is no less of a crime when stalking occurs in the context of a scheme to cause harm during litigation. The intent is provoke the victim into appearing more scared and to the point of looking paranoid than the targeted party would be otherwise. Because stalking can be obscured and sometimes explained away by the perpetrator, the victim may be easily discredited and thereby unable to receive protection. The perpetrator is then free to continue the stalking and harassing behavior. In situations like the one just described, the perpetrator often uses others to stalk and harass by proxy.

This scenario is one seen in many cases reported to My Advocate Center, and it is often the case that professionals being paid by the perpetrator are assisting in the series of crimes by coordinating and covering for the perpetrator. Doing so is profitable because it also helps prolong litigation as the perpetrator will pay to escalate the stress and injury to the victim while avoiding accountability for the criminal behavior. This is a dangerous trend in family courts and one that must be addressed now before more lives are lost – including those of the children witnessing this form of domestic or family violence.

 

Georgia Domestic Violence – Fatality Review Annual Report 2017 by Deb Beacham on Scribd